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Information about Jack-O-Lanterns

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Every October, carved pumpkins peer out from porches and doorsteps in the United States and other parts of the world. Gourd-like orange fruits inscribed with ghoulish faces and illuminated by candles are a sure sign of the Halloween season.  Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

Every October, carved pumpkins peer out from porches and doorsteps in the United States and other parts of the world. Gourd-like orange fruits inscribed with ghoulish faces and illuminated by candles are a sure sign of the Halloween season. Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

 

The practice of decorating

The practice of decorating "jack-o'-lanterns" - the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack-originated in Ireland, where large turnips and potatoes served as an early canvas. Irish immigrants brought the tradition to America, home of the pumpkin, and it became an integral part of Halloween festivities. Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

 

The Legend of

The Legend of "Stingy Jack"People have been making jack-o'-lanterns at Halloween for centuries. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed "Stingy Jack." According to the story, Stingy Jack invited the Devil to have a drink with him. True to his name, Stingy Jack didn't want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his pocket next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. The next year, Jack again tricked the Devil into climbing into a tree to pick a piece of fruit. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree's bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years. Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, upset by the trick Jack had played on him and keeping his word not to claim his soul, would not allow Jack into hell. He sent Jack off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Jack put the coal into a carved-out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with ever since. The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as "Jack of the Lantern," and then, simply "Jack O'Lantern." In Ireland and Scotland, people began to make their own versions of Jack's lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack o'lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o'-lanterns.Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

 

Stingy Jack was a miserable, old drunk who loved playing tricks on anyone and everyone. One dark, Halloween night, Jack ran into the Devil himself in a local public house. Jack tricked the Devil by offering his soul in exchange for one last drink. The Devil quickly turned himself into a sixpence to pay the bartender, but Jack immediately snatched the coin and deposited it into his pocket, next to a silver cross that he was carrying. Thus, the Devil could not change himself back and Jack refused to allow the Devil to go free until the Devil had promised not to claim Jack's soul for ten years.Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

Stingy Jack was a miserable, old drunk who loved playing tricks on anyone and everyone. One dark, Halloween night, Jack ran into the Devil himself in a local public house. Jack tricked the Devil by offering his soul in exchange for one last drink. The Devil quickly turned himself into a sixpence to pay the bartender, but Jack immediately snatched the coin and deposited it into his pocket, next to a silver cross that he was carrying. Thus, the Devil could not change himself back and Jack refused to allow the Devil to go free until the Devil had promised not to claim Jack's soul for ten years.Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

 

When Stingy Jack eventually passed away several years later, he went to the Gates of Heaven, but was refused entrance because of his life of drinking and because he had been so tight-fisted and deceitful. So, Jack then went down to Hell to see the Devil and find out whether it were possible to gain entrance into the depths of Hell, but the Devil kept the promise that had been made to Jack years earlier, and would not let him enter.

When Stingy Jack eventually passed away several years later, he went to the Gates of Heaven, but was refused entrance because of his life of drinking and because he had been so tight-fisted and deceitful. So, Jack then went down to Hell to see the Devil and find out whether it were possible to gain entrance into the depths of Hell, but the Devil kept the promise that had been made to Jack years earlier, and would not let him enter. "But where can I go?" asked Jack. "Back to where you came from!" replied the Devil. The way back was windy and very dark. Stingy Jack pleaded with the Devil to at least provide him with a light to help find his way. The Devil, as a final gesture, tossed Jack an ember straight from the fires of Hell. Jack placed the ember in a hollowed-out turnip...one of Jack's favorite foods which he always carried around with him whenever he could steal one. From that day forward, Stingy Jack has been doomed to roam the earth without a resting place and with only his lit turnip to light the way in the darkness. Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

Can you carve the best pumpkin around?  Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25.  Find our more about our party and get your tickets at:  https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

Can you carve the best pumpkin around? Enter your pumpkin in our contest on October 25. Find our more about our party and get your tickets at: https://dsgt2013bash.eventbrite.com/

 

In Ireland and Scotland, people believed that spirits and ghosts could enter their world on Halloween. These spirits and ghosts would be attracted to the comforts of their earthly lives. People not wanting to be visited by these ghosts would set food and treats out to appease the roaming spirits and began to make their own versions of Jack's lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack-o'-lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o'-lanterns. They were softer and easier to carve than the turnips and potatoes of their homeland.Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

In Ireland and Scotland, people believed that spirits and ghosts could enter their world on Halloween. These spirits and ghosts would be attracted to the comforts of their earthly lives. People not wanting to be visited by these ghosts would set food and treats out to appease the roaming spirits and began to make their own versions of Jack's lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack-o'-lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o'-lanterns. They were softer and easier to carve than the turnips and potatoes of their homeland.Find out more at: http://www.panicd.com/encyclopedia/jack-o-lanterns.html

 

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